BigSteelBox Supplies Best in Class WellSite Accommodation

Improved remote worksite conditions linked to productivity in oil & gas projects

Wellsite-living-kitchen_890.jpgJune 10, 2014 – Calgary, AB  BigSteelBox Structures’ best-in-class mobile wellsite accommodation is improving productivity on oil and gas projects, offering remote accommodations that offer better quality of life for workers.

Worksite labour conditions is the first of the Top 10 areas for improvement to increase productivity identified by University of Calgary professor Dr. George Jergeas, a leading expert in project management.

Quality living quarters combined with mobility and sustainability are the standard for BigSteelBox Structures’ next generation of wellsite accommodation.

“Our steel-and-skid container provides the oil industry the rigour required for consistent movement and the sustainability of a steel container – all with an executive touch,” says president Devon Siebenga. “Our product is built to be moved, incredibly durable, and made to truly feel like a home away from home.”

Jergeas’ productivity research shows that respectfully managed camp and transportation is key to reducing turnover, and stresses the need for quality of life off work.

Designed for the engineer or geologist, BigSteelBox Structures’ high-end modular living space provides the comforts of home while working away, and includes an office, kitchen and bedroom.

“Working in the field doesn’t mean your staff has to ‘rough it,’” says Siebenga. “Trailers that were once notorious among oilfield workers for being uncomfortable and generally unpleasant no longer meet the mark for companies that are serious about employee retention. A BigSteelBox Structure is safe, comfortable and constructed to the highest quality standards. All of our structures meet or exceed the guidelines established by the Government of Alberta for re-locatable industrial accommodations of which we are certified.”

Quality living quarters combined with mobility and sustainability are the standard for BigSteelBox Structures’ next generation of wellsite accommodation. The interior-designed modular unit provides a condo feel, complete with air conditioning, stainless appliances and floor to ceiling windows, but with a price-point consistent with industry trends. Units can be constructed starting at $120,000.

The structures can be shipped by boat, truck or train and are virtually indestructible. Unlike traditional wood-frame construction, a BigSteelBox Structure provides a sustainable solution and can be refurbished and re-purposed, even after many years in the field.

BigSteelBox Structures has completed over 600 projects using modified shipping containers, with customers including Rio Tinto, Cenovus Energy, Kiewit Energy Canada Corp and Teck Resources Limited. Composed of corten corrugated steel, BigSteelBoxes are built to withstand the abuse of ocean travel and constant movement.

The history of BigSteelBox Structures began in 1999 with the establishment of BigSteelBox, Canada’s fastest growing moving and mobile storage company. BigSteelBox Structures is headquartered in Kelowna, B.C. in the Okanagan Valley.

Photos: Media can download high-resolution photos from Dropbox.

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